soroban_05

First of all, let me talk about our thoughts on soroban and Japanese penmanship.

We’ve been teaching thousands of children for over 20 years at Morita Juku, a private cramming school.

Since it’s not a big crammer, we get close to children as well as their parents. Therefore, we’ve had lots of
opportunities to talk with mothers over discipline and mental issues of children. Especially,
when they came to take entrance exams for high school which could be described as the first hardship of their lives,
we’ve tried hard to encourage them to face forward sometimes with tears. At the same time,
we feel we have learned a lot with them.
We all grow old and children are the ones who play crucial roles in the next generations.
In other words, education for children is very important to create the brighter future,
and from there we believe various creations will begin.
Soroban and Japanese penmanship are the very basic forms of learning that have been inherited as reading,
writing and soroban since the Edo period.

In this era where many things change their forms every few years, it is really rare that the same method has
remained keeping its original form over three hundred years. We believe that is something very genuine.

However, the number of people who learn soroban and/or Japanese penmanship reached its highest in the
late 1960’s/early 1970’s, and has kept decreasing into one-fifteenth of its peak.

Nevertheless, we still believe we, Japanese, should not forget our culture: reading, writing and soroban,
as the genuine forms of basic education during the high economic growth period that was established on these methods.

Japanese are thought originally to be right-brained which is intuitive and emotional rather than left-brained
which tends to be logical and rational. That can be shown in the fact that there is no proper translation in English
for “Okagesama” and “Arigatou” (both mean “thank you”). We decide things on moral grounds not on calculations
of loss and gain, which we think a virtue of Japanese people.

Well, we went off the track a bit. Anyways, these wonderful methods that have been passed down over three hundred years,
reading, writing and soroban, will still remain indispensable for basic learning in Japan. That is something we must inherit
to next generations.

We always talk our thoughts to teachers at the very beginning of their training at Kodomo School and only ones
who agree with it teach soroban and Japanese penmanship here.
The latest advanced computer education might be necessary as well, however, we would strongly wish more
children to acquire reading, writing and soroban as Japanese.

The origin of education that famous scholars and statesmen such as Takamori Saigo, Ryouma Sakamoto, Kaishu Katsu
and Shoin Yoshida placed importance on was reading, writing and soroban. Above all, they had Goju education
in which elder ones take care of younger ones while younger ones look up to the elder ones.
It also taught essential teachings as a human being such as you mustn’t lie, you mustn’t bully, and etc.

We strongly hope that the soroban and Japanese penmanship make a positive impact on children
who will bear the next generation and establish prosperous future for Japan.
It would be my utmost pleasure if you, parents, would understand and agree with our ideas and support your children
as well as Kodomo school.

 

こどもスクール

こどもスクール